How to Know Whether or Not You Need a Hearing Aid

By Andrew J. Parker, M.D
January 26, 2015
Category: Hearing Aids
Tags: Hearing Aids   hearing loss  

Plenty of things you do every day can help you determine whether or not you may need hearing aids. There are all sorts of questions you can ask yourself and some self-assessments you can do, but the best way to figure out if you need a hearing aid is to have your hearing examined by a professional. Andrew J. Parker, M.D, an ear, nose and throat doctor in Norwalk & Westport, CT, can tell you whether or not you need a hearing aid. If you've noticed a few of the following things, you may want to make an appointment.

Think about your social experiences. How you encounter conversations and interactions in public places may carry several signs of hearing loss. Do you frequently ask people to repeat themselves? Do you often feel like others are mumbling their speech? Is it difficult to hear movies at the theater or people speaking to a large group? If you can't see someone's face, do you have more trouble understanding what they're saying? All these things may indicate hearing loss.

People who suffer from hearing issues sometimes withdraw from social interactions because their inability to hear properly makes these situations uncomfortable. That's understandable — failing to understand someone may lead you to respond inappropriately or miss something important that was shared. If you find yourself avoiding such things, that's another sign you need to get your hearing checked out.

If you're not a particularly social person to begin with, there are plenty of things you do at home or at work that may help you identify possible hearing loss. When you're watching TV or listening to music, do others ask you to turn down the volume? Does it seem like people have trouble getting your attention? It may be because you didn't hear them the first (or third) time they called your name. Even though you're likely to take a call with a bad connection from time to time, if your phone's volume is maxed out and you struggle to hear the other person on every call, it might not be their voice or the connection. Inability to understand phone calls is another sign of hearing loss.

The good news is there are many ways you can recover lost hearing and improve your well-being in the process. The first thing to do is consult an ear, nose and throat doctor like Dr. Parker for a hearing assessment, and then you can start moving toward the happiness that comes with improved hearing.

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